9 Greek Goddesses to Know and Work With

Hellenism: 9 Greek Goddesses to Know and Work With

Take a voyage into the world of the Greek goddesses of the Hellenic pantheon.

In their temples of flowing cloth and smoldering incense, the Greeks worshiped these mistresses of mythology for centuries.

Sometimes fierce, sometimes dreamy and feminine, the goddesses of the Greek pantheon enliven ancient tales with their beguiling wit and wisdom.  

Learn their names, their energetic signatures and their magical ways. 

What is Hellenism?

In the context of religion, Hellenism refers to indigenous beliefs in the gods and goddesses of the ancient Greek pantheon, as well as their spiritual customs, philosophies and particular style of living.

Of course, the Hellenic religion originated in the land of Greece.  However, during the Hellenic period (around the 4th century BC), it quickly spread throughout the Mediterranean, adopting many variations throughout the ancient world.

Strictly speaking, modern Hellenism is a revival religion in which adherents attempt to replicate the religious rites and rituals as closely as possible to their original form.  

However, the incorporation of Greek goddesses into modern witchcraft rituals exists on a much broader spectrum. 

This ranges from the extreme end of fundamentalist ritual recreation, to a much more liberal interpretation of gods and goddesses as metaphors or energies, rather than literal deities to be worshiped in the traditional sense.

Whether you are considering taking the Hellenic path as a spiritual journey, or simply want to expand your awareness of different ancient pantheons, the following Greek goddesses appear commonly in Hellenic mythology and religious ritual.

Hestia

How to set up and maintain a household altar.

Although traditional ancient mythology rarely included her in its characteristic drama, Greek life featured Hestia prominently in day-to-day worship.

Greek households maintained an altar to Hestia and traditionally offered her the first sacrifice.  The sought her protection for domestic peace and a thriving hearth fire.

Interestingly, Hestia’s modern servants often cover their hair with a cloth or head wrap to honor her image as a demure, veiled goddess.

Goddess of the hearth and home, Hestia makes an appropriate choice for a household altar.

Athena

Goddess of wisdom and warfare, Athena’s cool-headed presence inspires careful thought and restraint.

Of particular interest to the creative spirit, the ancients also associated Athena with the arts, especially handicrafts like weaving.  

Mysteriously, poets frequently described Athena in the company of an owl, or taking the form of an owl herself.  The reasons for this remain bewildering.  

Although in modern times we think of the owl as a symbol of wisdom, mythologists suggest more ancient origins of Minoan palace cults.  

Charmingly, the poet Homer often referred to Athena’s grey eyes.

Artemis 

Artemis wandered the woodlands with a band of nymphs, living wildly alongside the natural world.

Often depicted with a bundle of arrows and a hunting dog, Artemis ruled the hunt.

Goddess of wild animals and daughter of Zeus, the Greeks considered the bear sacred to this fierce goddess.

Her associations often centered around the lives of women.  She paradoxically protected both virginity and the welfare of women in childbirth.

Aphrodite

Aphrodite: 9 Facts About the Greek Goddess of Love.

Commonly called on in matters of love and romance, the Greeks revered Aphrodite for her beauty and feminine charms.

The elegant symbols associated with Aphrodite reveal her graceful nature.  Sometimes represented by swans, seashells and roses, admirers call on Aphrodite to settle affairs of the heart.

Fertility, passion and beauty all reside in her domain.

Gaia

Although a relatively minor deity in the ancient world, this earthy, primordial goddess enjoys a prominent place in hearts of modern eco-spiritualism as the origin of all earthly life.

There is little evidence that any cult was devoted exclusively to her worship.  The ancients mostly worshiped Gaia in association with the cult of Demeter.  

Nemesis 

With a name like that, this vengeful goddess needs little introduction.

As you likely guessed, the gods called upon the Nemesis to exact revenge and restore balance when wrongdoing tipped the scales of justice.  

Also sometimes called Rhamnusia, she took special displeasure in anyone invested in indiscriminate criminal behavior.

Hebe

Goddess of everlasting youth, Hebe is often depicted serving the gods ambrosia, a divine food of the gods said to impart immortality.

Although the ancients mostly worshipped Hebe alongside other deities, she appears to have had her own cult, and as well as several sites of worship in the Hellenic world.

Hebe is often confused with the goddess Nike, who is also frequently depicted with large, angelic wings.

Nike

Often pictured dramatically with large wings, Nike is the goddess of victory.

Sometimes associated with triumphant athletes (even in modern times!), the ancients maintained an altar to her in Olympia.

The laurel wreath is her symbol, and is still used as an emblem of victory today in the modern Olympic games.

Rhea

Mother of gods, Rhea’s name means flow.  

As a matter of symbolism, flow represents the natural state and behavior of water, connoting milk, childbirth and other features essential to life in ancient Greece.

In her book, (affiliate link —->) In Search of God the Mother:  The Cult of Anatolian Cybele, historian and mythologist, Lynn E. Roller, describes Rhea’s cult as one of ecstatic dancers.  

Using rhythmic chants and hand drums, her followers induced in each other states of spiritual ecstasy.

How beautiful.

Sacred Hellenism: Greek Goddesses to Know and Work With

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3 Comments

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